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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    110

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    wow you guys are having to go down to some course paper. I just did a guys bay boat that was heavily oxidized and I got away with 800 wet and then again to 1000 wet. I got the 3m heavy cut compound from academy and another brand for polish to use on his boat. I cut it down until all of it was smoked over the color and used the heavy cut compound and my buffer to do the cutting on it. I would get it to start to shine and do two coats of polish and it made it shine really nice. Same steps worked wonders on my top side that was pretty bad on my boat also.

    My boat also had a pink looking line on the top side similiar color to the blue boat. I hit it with 800 and 100 and when I was done cutting and polishing with my compound and polish. It came out a darker red.
    Last edited by a_deleon; 04-23-2012 at 05:54 PM.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Edmond, OK
    Posts
    2,205

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    Considering the feedback, taking a few steps back and looking at mine, and following the comment I saw on the other thread by haugy, I'm planning to do the 600 wet and go from there. I'm thinking I'll do half of one side and take it through the whole process so I can see the before and after side-by-side. Then I can decided if that was enough and if I'm happy with the results.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I own a ts6m and recently removed the stripes, I do this as part of my job on a regular basis so the best way to do this is with a heat gun (body shop grade) then polish it using the NORTON 3 step polish system called LIQUID ICE ! IF you need to wetsand stage it out ( start with 1000 finish with a fine grit like 2000) the finer the finish git is the easier the polishing will be !

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1

    Default Stripe removal wets

    3m products makes a vinyl stripe removal wheel ,looks like the material a pencil eraser is made of you chuck up in a drill,it will remove the stripe without damaging your paint

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    65

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    Quote Originally Posted by 86 century View Post
    Geting the lines to fade is alot of work.

    Wet sanding will not even make a mark in it.
    Mine is the same color as yours I ended up using a da with 150grit on it to get the color back.
    Im still working on geting it the scuffs from that out.
    I am a custom automotive painter and just wet sanded my boat to be restriped, the advice I can offer you is gel coat is like concrete compared to clear coat so you have to be aggressive. Start with 320 or 400 dry then move to a 600 dry then 600 wet, 800 dry and then wet etc etc with 1000, 1500 and finish at 2000. Use a heavy duty compound not fine or medium. make sure after sanding with 400 theres no shine anywhere after wiping it down. Heres some pics of it after the wet sand and rub most before the new stripes030.jpg031.jpgSAM_1214.jpgSAM_1211.jpg043.jpg
    Last edited by jshepp122; 05-26-2012 at 01:26 PM.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jshepp122 View Post
    Start with 320 or 400 dry then move to a 600 dry then 600 wet, 800 dry and then wet etc etc with 1000, 1500 and finish at 2000. Use a heavy duty compound not fine or medium. make sure after sanding with 400 theres no shine anywhere after wiping it down. Heres some pics of it after the wet sand and rub most before the new stripes


    FOR THE LOVE OF GOD........DO NOT DO THIS TO YOUR BOAT!!!!!!!!!! ESPECIALLY DRY!

    Going down to anything under 600 grit is for fixing damaged areas on your gelcoat. Not polishing it. You will take too much off. Oxidation is not that thick, just very hard. The only reason you would need to go that aggressive is to remove major damage scratches. And make sure it is wet, not dry.

    Please, anyone reading this, start with 600 grit at the most! Most boats only need 1000 grit +, and some patience. I've polished up some really bad boats, and have never gone lower than 600 grit.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Augusta, GA
    Posts
    103

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    +1 what Haugy said. More elbow grease, not more grit.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    65

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    Quote Originally Posted by haugy View Post
    for the love of god........do not do this to your boat!!!!!!!!!! Especially dry!

    Going down to anything under 600 grit is for fixing damaged areas on your gelcoat. Not polishing it. You will take too much off. Oxidation is not that thick, just very hard. The only reason you would need to go that aggressive is to remove major damage scratches. And make sure it is wet, not dry.

    Please, anyone reading this, start with 600 grit at the most! Most boats only need 1000 grit +, and some patience. I've polished up some really bad boats, and have never gone lower than 600 grit.
    yes! Do not do this to your boat for excellent results from someone who has been doing this for 15 years

  9. #39
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jshepp122 View Post
    I am a custom automotive painter
    Last time I checked automotive paint and Gelcoat are like fire and ice. Treat them completely different. Congrats on doing this for 15 years. Many of has have been doing these boats for longer.

    To those who read it. Your boat does not need that much grit. The risk for a mistake multiplies drastically. With a lighter grit, if you do make any mistakes, they won't be as noticeable. You make a mistake with 320 grit, and you can't go back.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    65

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by haugy View Post
    Last time I checked automotive paint and Gelcoat are like fire and ice. Treat them completely different. Congrats on doing this for 15 years. Many of has have been doing these boats for longer.

    To those who read it. Your boat does not need that much grit. The risk for a mistake multiplies drastically. With a lighter grit, if you do make any mistakes, they won't be as noticeable. You make a mistake with 320 grit, and you can't go back.
    Understandable, but being a custom painter I've done countless boats im not just limited to cars, gel coat is a thicker mill than clear coat (total gel coat factory 20 mils, total clearcoat factory 3 mils), 400 all day cannot penetrate through it, with oxidation I dont recommend starting at that but I had die back and chalking, you need to be aggressive at that point. Gel coat is a polyester resin, not urethane like clear coat. It is used to add structural integrity to the fiberglass. This is a quote from the data sheet for evercoat gel coat, "Once the gel coat is cured, sand with 400-grit sandpaper, then 600-grit or finer to achieve a
    smooth surface." so starting at 400 is ok.
    Last edited by jshepp122; 07-01-2012 at 02:31 PM.

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